Former TIPRO Chairman Brent Hopkins and TIPRO President Ed Longanecker pictured with Texas Governor Greg Abbott at the association’s Annual Convention in 2022. Photo courtesy of the Texas Independent Producers & Royalty Owners Association.

Longanecker Leads TIPRO with Passion and Dedication

Career paths take many shapes and sizes in a world that continues to evolve drastically. While some seem to fall into or happen upon a specific career that ignites and continues to fuel that passion, others take a direction predetermined by confidence and the drive of knowing precisely what they want and how to get it. The standard of going to work for a company when first entering the workforce and remaining through retirement is less common than it once was, and the call to find happiness and fulfillment increasingly surpasses the need to earn a high-dollar income.

Ed Longanecker, president of the Texas Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association (TIPRO), falls into the latter group. Although his career originated in oil and gas, he would make an early exit which would lead to a discovery of his true talents. That skill set would later pave the way back to oil and gas and in a role crucial to the state of Texas and the United States.

TIPRO President Ed Longanecker with Texas Congressmen Henry Cuellar (D-Laredo) and August Pfluger (R-Midland) at a TIPRO conference.
TIPRO President Ed Longanecker with Texas Congressmen Henry Cuellar (D-Laredo) and August Pfluger (R-Midland) at a TIPRO conference.

Full Circle Career Path

Longanecker graduated from college in 1996 and immediately stepped into the oil and gas industry with Can-Tex Energy, an independent producer in Dallas, Texas. Over four years, he held various roles, including vice president of operations. His responsibilities proved impressive and included fundraising and evaluating projects in the Victoria and Bee counties in Texas. He would later exit Can-Tex and the oil and gas industry.

“Having had my fill of dry holes and a growing interest in working in the technology sector, I left Can-Tex Energy to work for the American Electronics Association (AeA), established by David Packard, the founder of Hewlett Packard,” says Longanecker. “AeA was the largest technology trade and advocacy association in the country with 17 regional offices in the United States, headquarters in Washington D.C., and operations in Europe and Japan.”

Longanecker immediately excelled and would spend the next eight years of his career with AeA in Chicago, where he was tasked with opening the organization’s Midwest chapter. He gained experience and found success in spearheading advocacy programs and taking advantage of numerous opportunities to represent AeA membership on various state and federal policy issues.

TIPRO President Ed Longanecker with Diamondback Energy CEO Travis Stice during a TIPRO meeting.
TIPRO President Ed Longanecker with Diamondback Energy CEO Travis Stice during a TIPRO meeting.

“I was tasked with managing a 13-state region for all state legislative priorities facing the technology sector, a stint at managing the association’s 50-state legislative program, including all in-house and contract lobbyists and related strategies,” says Longanecker. “I was later promoted to senior vice president, maintaining my 13-state advocacy role, but also given the responsibility for managing all regional offices, staff, sales, programs and member retention nationally for the association.”

Having gained an intense knowledge base and thirst for the work, Longanecker accepted an offer from a Chicago-based governmental affairs consulting firm shortly before this 13th anniversary with AeA. His job scope was directed toward managing client relations and related priorities in local and state government, in addition to multiple political campaigns. The stay would prove temporary as Longanecker would soon take the knowledge and experience gained and return to Texas and oil and gas, where his career first began.

“My wife wanted to move back to Texas to be closer to family, so when the TIPRO position was posted, I applied. Having extensive experience in association management at all levels, including government affairs, fundraising and managing a large team of employees, and nearly four years working in the oil and gas industry, I was hired as the association’s new president in November of 2012.”

TIPRO President Ed Longanecker discusses industry priorities with Apache CEO John Christmann IV during a conference hosted by TIPRO in 2021. Photos courtesy of the Texas Independent Producers & Royalty Owners Association.
TIPRO President Ed Longanecker discusses industry priorities with Apache CEO John Christmann IV during a conference hosted by TIPRO in 2021. Photos courtesy of the Texas Independent Producers & Royalty Owners Association.

Flush with Motivation

They say a happy wife means a happy life. While that might be true, Longanecker’s motivation is much more profound. He says his family’s happiness is critically essential. Still, he has remained at TIPRO because of the organization’s massive role in preserving energy security and economic opportunity for Texas and the rest of the country.

“Having started my career in the oil and gas industry, I have always had an affinity and appreciation for the sector and the people working within the industry. I believe the oil and natural gas industry is the most important industry in the world for providing energy security, economic opportunity, and thousands of products and conveniences that we all enjoy and utilize daily.”

Because of his appreciation for TIPRO’s membership, Longanecker finds passion through representation and serves as a primary focus in what fuels his day-to-day activities. TIPRO serves its members by providing effective representation on policy and legal issues faced in the industry, but continues its reach with updates and committees only available to its members. Longanecker says these abilities help the organization prepare and protect oil and gas professionals.

“I think any individual or company that supports the unmatched benefits and importance of the Texas oil and natural gas industry should join TIPRO. We are one of the country’s most effective and active associations for providing credible data, analysis and education on key issues to members, policy leaders and the general public about oil and natural gas.”

No matter the size, Longanecker finds satisfaction in knowing that TIPRO is a consistent and credible source in representing both small and large Texas operators, as well as royalty owners and service companies. TIPRO provides an avenue for executives to not only network but also receive education on some of the biggest issues facing the oil and gas industry. Longanecker considers this aspect a large part of the services provided by TIPRO.

“Since joining TIPRO, I have maintained the organization’s leadership role in providing effective advocacy for our members and have also expanded our communications, industry education, data and analysis capabilities, which have greatly enhanced our effectiveness in representing the voice of our members and the Texas oil and natural gas industry.”

Longanecker sees tremendous importance in communicating with policy leaders and staff regarding critical objectives and strategies. Conversations are not limited to membership areas, he notes. With dedication equally matching motivation, Longanecker typically initiates each workday with a 4 a.m. wake-up to review email and read industry news and trends in the sector. His 7 a.m. arrival at the office sparks interaction with TIPRO members and prospective members.

“Most days, I also have some level of communication with the media commenting on various issues and preparing for our events, which attract hundreds of leaders in our industry every month,” says Longanecker.

Being up to date and aware of the issues surrounding the oil and gas industry allows him to steer TIPRO in representing its membership and portion of the industry. Effectively providing the highest level of representation catalyzes Longanecker in performing his duties and serving those people and entities he represents.

TIPRO President Ed Longanecker with past TIPRO Chairman Allen Gilmer at a past TIPRO NASDAQ event in New York City.
TIPRO President Ed Longanecker with past TIPRO Chairman Allen Gilmer at a past TIPRO NASDAQ event in New York City.

Taking TIPRO Into the Future

Longanecker says that he found his niche with TIPRO and plans to remain in his current role. He sees a future oil and gas industry needing TIPRO representation in navigating uncertain waters. During a regular legislative session, the organization typically monitors more than 300 bills associated with the oil and gas sector. During Texas’ last legislative session in 2021, TIPRO took formal positions on 90 of those bills.

“We have an ongoing interaction with elected officials and provide regular updates and analysis on all legislation that could impact membership,” says Longanecker. “We have successfully opposed and advanced legislation for the benefit of our industry during every legislative cycle since we were founded.”

After Longanecker joined TIPRO, the organization introduced and passed a bill providing a five-year severance tax exemption for wells that have not been active for two years or more. This aids in preventing waste by identifying wells that still have economic life and reducing the number of inactive wells stationed in Texas.

TIPRO furthered its effectiveness when hydraulic fracturing was banned in Denton, Texas. The organization supported House Bill 40, affirming the state’s exclusive jurisdiction over subsurface oil and natural gas activities.

“We also supported legislation to create the Produced Water Consortium to collect information resources to study the economics of and technology related to beneficial uses of produced water,” mentions Longanecker. “The consortium met with academia, environmental groups, and oil and gas producers on numerous occasions to develop a report.”

According to Longanecker, the report included recommendations to be discussed and considered in the next legislative session. They will consist of establishing a fund for pilot projects as well as testing needs. He says TIPRO will pursue encouraging the Railroad Commission and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to consider processes critical in permitting produced water for safe and beneficial use. TIPRO will also attempt to persuade the Texas Water Development Board and regional planning groups to consider these solutions, including produced water in regional water supply projects.

TIPRO staff (pictured from left to right: TIPRO Membership Coordinator Anjelica Torres, Government Affairs Director Ryan Paylor, President Ed Longanecker, Vice President of Finance and Administration Joanne Reynolds and Communications Director Kelli Snyder).
TIPRO staff (pictured from left to right: TIPRO Membership Coordinator Anjelica Torres, Government Affairs Director Ryan Paylor, President Ed Longanecker, Vice President of Finance and Administration Joanne Reynolds and Communications Director Kelli Snyder).

Although TIPRO has successfully represented Texas oil and gas on these issues, Longanecker says the future will continue to create a need for the organization’s existence. He sees multiple challenges for energy producers ranging from increased regulatory burdens and limitations in capital access. The current workforce shortage, supply chain obstacles and inflationary fears will continue to attempt to define the industry.

Longanecker understands these challenges and has recognized them early on. He adds that TIPRO’s footprint is critical to overcoming these plights that attempt to derail progress and the industry’s future. TIPRO supports the industry by maintaining a business-friendly atmosphere in the state from legislative and regulatory perspectives. He says this enables TIPRO to combat those policies and provisions that burden the industry.

“I see a generational shift occurring in our industry as a challenge, not just with individuals retiring, but also the next generation within some of our long-term member families choosing a different career path. So, a focus, challenge and opportunity is engaging the next generation of leaders in our industry with TIPRO, with students or young professionals that will be the leaders of our industry in the future.”

Throughout the oil and gas industry, savings are sought to boost profits. Reducing expenses and adopting streamlined processes fuel this business practice. Longanecker recognizes the importance of innovation and has guided TIPRO in focusing on best practices at conferences to help members understand new techniques or services that can enhance operations and yield larger profit margins. He adds that education is critical in understanding the industry from those who work as a part of it and those who condemn it.

Past TIPRO chairmen and association leaders.
Past TIPRO chairmen and association leaders.

“In a world full of anti-oil and gas rhetoric, we again serve as a credible source of information, data and analysis to help people educate themselves about our industry,” asserts Longanecker.

While identifying the challenges plaguing TIPRO members and the oil and gas industry, Longanecker carries the weight of how to overcome these challenges. He describes his approach as a team effort that is multi-faceted. Supporting the next generation of industry leadership and membership is a significant priority within the strategy. A major effort is made to include students and families in organizing events to expose them to industry issues and the critical importance of the Texas oil and natural gas industry.

“There is inherent value in mentoring and communicating with future leaders, and we certainly focus on that as part of our efforts to protect the future of our industry and organization,” says Longanecker.

The year 2030 is a marker of change and existence for the oil and gas industry. Entities are currently determining how all accommodations will be made to survive in what is to be. Whether an industry bound by significant restrictions and a call to cut emissions, one that seizes innovation as a step toward efficiency, or even a combination of both, Longanecker will lead TIPRO in responding however needed. He believes his role and maintaining the association’s mission and identity will continue to serve its membership and the industry to the maximum ability. His admiration for the members he represents inspires his dedication and calling to protect the industry in which he started his career and later returned to serve.

Longanecker affirms, “TIPRO represents incredible people who are among the most generous, genuine and principled individuals I’ve had the honor of knowing in my lifetime.”

Headline Photo: Former TIPRO Chairman Brent Hopkins and TIPRO President Ed Longanecker pictured with Texas Governor Greg Abbott at the association’s Annual Convention in 2022. Photo courtesy of the Texas Independent Producers & Royalty Owners Association.

Author Profile
Freelance Writer and Photographer

Nick Vaccaro is a freelance writer and photographer. In addition to providing technical writing services, he is an HSE consultant in the oil and gas industry with eight years of experience. Vaccaro also contributes to SHALE Oil and Gas Business Magazine, Louisiana Sportsman Magazine, and follows and photographs American Kennel Club field and herding trials. He has a BA in photojournalism from Loyola University and resides in the New Orleans area. Vaccaro can be reached at 985-966-0957 or navaccaro@outlook.com

Oil and gas operations are commonly found in remote locations far from company headquarters. Now, it's possible to monitor pump operations, collate and analyze seismic data, and track employees around the world from almost anywhere. Whether employees are in the office or in the field, the internet and related applications enable a greater multidirectional flow of information – and control – than ever before.

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